@jessmahler hey uh your article about your experience with aphantasia is the first time I’ve read a description that matches how I think. Thank you. People think I must be very visual in my head because I do lighting design and highly associative tasks (which many people remember visually). But in both cases, my brain works in abstract associations. I know what colours go together because I have seen them before, and can put them in front of me. But I don’t picture scenes or memories in my head (well, not beyond the limited sense of ‘outline’ that you describe as experiencing).

@s0 Hey, neat, I hadn't read that aphantasia description before! Mine works *almost* exactly the same, except what I think of as my kinesthetic sense has almost no tactile but a ton of spatial. My brain knows *where* things are for touching and how firm/flimsy they are, but with very little sense of actually touching them.

/ @jessmahler

@s0 Also abstractions work really well for me. Sometimes I translate them into space for easier manipulation or explanation. If I'm explaining code to someone I'll put abstractions at different points in space and gesture to show the connections. I think some people read this as me being visual, but I don't *see* them there at all. And I can't *feel* them. They just have a definite location in space.

/ @jessmahler

@s0 Also-also I totally do the thing where sometimes I'm wordsing a concept, but then some part of it doesn't really translate to words, so that part stays not-words in the middle of a words-thought. The fluency of that not-words-to-words translation varies, and nonverbal is a general term for when that translation isn't fully happening. And for me too that translation feels like a mask. Not working isn't *broken*: It's just less masked.

/ @jessmahler

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Wandering Shop

The Wandering Shop is a Mastodon instance initially geared for the science fiction and fantasy community but open to anyone. We want our 'local' timeline to have the feel of a coffee shop at a good convention: tables full of friendly conversation on a wide variety of topics. We welcome everyone who wants to participate, so long as you're willing to abide by our code of conduct.