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Janelle Shane @janellecshane
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I did some experiments that really highlight how heavily image recognition algorithms depend on probability - and how unprepared they are for surrealism.
aiweirdness.com/post/171451900

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@janellecshane You might find this interesting:
open-codes.zkm.de/en/work/rzl-
It's an art project, which uses AI to generate patterns, which fool other AIs.

Those patterns for example make an AI recognize a tank painted with it as an umbrella or similar.

@freundTech Thanks for the link! I hope they'll post some of the results sometime - it would be interesting to read.

@janellecshane there was a mastodon bot that "recognized" pics ... Where is it now?

@janellecshane Thanks a lot, just what I needed before going to sleep.

@janellecshane

My student trained some classifiers on ImageNet and the result was that all quadrupeds were predicted as dog.

We then switched to MS Coco and found that -- while the caption generation is often good for a laugh -- the object detection was not pretty good in most cases.

Not detecting sheep on trees maybe shows that the Deep Networks now have actually a good "common sense"

I wonder how it fare on the columbine harvester picture?

reddit.com/r/funny/comments/7r

@deeds Ha, what a picture! As you predicted, Microsoft Azure (trained on Coco, I believe) reported it as "a crowd of people"

@deeds But Cloudsight is an interesting case! It seamlessly uses humans for the hard one and since the caption was part of the photo...
Object: "green and yellow combine harvester"
Scene: "This Look Like A Sick Concert Text"

@janellecshane Surrealism relies upon contextual comprehension.

That is an AI-hard problem, and until we have functionally structured AI designs, that will be very hard to achieve, and effectively impossible to prove if we do achieve it.

@janellecshane That's not surprising, given the nature of the training the neural networks are put through: I don't suppose pictures like yours are typically shown to them.

Conclusion: the tools we are using to recognise images are still too basic (and we understand them quite poorly).

The pics and the comments are coool 👏