#solarpunk #hackerspace #writing question: what would be the most Solarpunk / realistic / interesting way to heat a hackerspace in a city in colder climate? Something to make a story interesting & visual?

The usual answer "servers" isn't that eco

Follow

@alxd I used to work for a software company (in NYS!) and we didn't notice our furnace was broken until a sub-zero (F) day in mid-winter, between the interns we had stacked on each other, the servers, and the workstations.

@alxd (not sure your location from your profile, so mid-NY has a last frost day of may and a first frost day of October and we're generally sub freezing from November through early March at least.

@aldersprig Thank you :) The story is in Central Europe, so yeah, we can get similar times.

We used to heat the 'Space with servers as well, but what used to happen is someone would often start mining BTC or Ethereum to get warmer. I just wonder if there are other good solutions that can be Solarpunk symbols :)

@alxd I grew up in a house that was heated with wood and passive solar heating. Lots of stone/cement is the first thing, for sure.

@alxd @aldersprig a kitchen or a gym could be sources of heat.

solarthermal panels on the roof don't work very well when there is little sun 🤷‍♀️

@malte @alxd but windmills do! Well, I mean, we have no sun and lots of wind here.

And I hadn't thought of a kitchen, even though my baking doubles in the winter to heat that end of the house!

Bread!!

@aldersprig @alxd another thing that produces heat, and generates gas that can produce heat is a biogas-chamber. though, it needs to be kept warm itself to function ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

@malte @alxd

hacker space:

"I've hacked this bread recipe because we were out of sugar and I couldn't find any butter and do you know what Hans did to the mixer...???"

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Wandering Shop

The Wandering Shop is a Mastodon instance initially geared for the science fiction and fantasy community but open to anyone. We want our 'local' timeline to have the feel of a coffee shop at a good convention: tables full of friendly conversation on a wide variety of topics. We welcome everyone who wants to participate, so long as you're willing to abide by our code of conduct.